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Procedures

 

Calling the Police

Club and bar owners are not big fans when it comes to making a call to their local police department every time an incident occurs in their venue.  This is why they hire Bouncers. But what if the security staff is overwhelmed by the amount of patrons in the venue, or deadly weapons are involved, is it now the time to make that call to the police?

Many club owners refuse to call the police because they believe that:
1.      It's a waste of the police department's time.
2.      It's a negative mark against them or their venue.
3.      It's the venue's responsibility, due to the fact that the employees and patrons are their responsibility. 
4.      Too many calls made to the police department is an indication that the venue has too many problems.

While these are the top reasons why club owners avoid calling the police when an incident occurs, not one of them is a good reason not to make the call.

Most local police departments encourage club and bar owners to call them on incidents that the venue may need assistance with.  Calling the police to your venue to ask an undesirable patron to leave the premises when you have your own security staff is not unheard of.  Or asking if officers could stand in front of the venue during closing time for a display of police presence.

With that being said, calls made to the police department are reported and documented as this policy and normal procedure.  However, are excessive they could be looked at as annoying or time taken away from another and more meaningful official police business. Don't be annoying. We recommend that you get to know your local police department.  From the officers who may enter your venue during a normal beat patrol, to the dispatcher or  the watch commander.  Introducing your venue and asking what can you or your club can do to make their job easier is a great ice breaker.

Some venues are known to offer discounts off of food or waive the cover charge to neighboring businesses.  This also is not a bad way to introduce your venue to the local police department.

So what does all this mean?  If your venue is handling unwanted incidents in a responsible and professional manner, then it's acceptable to call the police when you foresee that you're not able to.

When your local police department recognizes that your venue is in the community to have a respectable business, you will soon find out that calling the police will be a call that is appreciated.

An emergency number list near a telephone with the following information should be posted and accessible to all employees.

 

LOCAL EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS

 

 

EMERGENCY: 911

LOCAL POLICE:

                     Front Desk: _____________________________

                               Watch Commander: _______________________ 

                     Dispatch: ______________________________

 

 

 

LOCAL FIRE DEPARTMENT: ______________________________

 

FIRE MARSHALL: _______________________

 

 

 
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